postgrad

I’m about to graduate! There’s been a ton of resources available while I’m at Harvard. Do you have any tips about how to find things once I’m out of the college bubble?

RC: Building off last week’s post, this week we are going to speak to some national resources that folks might find of interest when thinking about sexual and interpersonal wellbeing.  We will start with a quick run-through of resources that address sexual health and then look at some that address interpersonal wellbeing.

AG: One awesome thing about the digital world we live in today is that there are an amazing array of great online informational resources. Of course, that means that there’s also a lot of not-so-great information online, but some websites that we recommend if you are looking for sexual health information include:

Many of these have Q&A boards similar to our website, as well as informational articles. None of these offer direct healthcare services, which we talked a bit about last week. But just a reminder that places like Planned Parenthood or community health clinics can be a good first stop for accessing health care.

RC: When thinking about interpersonal wellbeing, it’s really important to note that there is no set formula or map that will define relationships.  We try to stress that understanding interpersonal wellbeing is less about understanding objective symptomatology and more about understanding the felt- and lived- impact of the interpersonal dynamics.  Because of this, interpersonal practices that might help me thrive might really not work for someone else, and vice versa. That being said, there are some important resources for folks who are interested in learning more about interpersonal harm, health, and how to be a mutual and equitable person.

AG: You can also find even more resources, broken down by category, via OSAPR’s website! Navigating this world of information can be overwhelming but there are definitely a ton of amazing organizations out there doing great work and publishing really useful content. Good luck!

RC:  Wow, we made it through a whirlwind academic year!  For those of you who are graduating, including the person who wrote in with this question, we wish you nothing but the best as you move into the next phase of your lives.  For those of you who we will see around campus in the Fall, have a great summer, and we will see you soon! Thanks for reading!

I’m about to graduate! There’s been a ton of free resources available while I’m at Harvard. Do you have any tips about how to find things once I’m out of the college bubble?

RC:  That’s a great and complicated question!  For anyone who has been in a workshop with me, y’all will know that my whole way of thinking is organized around access to resources and this is a shining example of that.  Depending on employment status, access to health insurance, income level, geographical location, and a number of other contextual factors, a person’s access to free and/or reduced-cost health and wellness resources will likely vary.

AG: A benefit to being employed in some organizations is access to employee assistance programs. These are programs that can “offer free and confidential assessments, short-term counseling, referrals, and follow-up services to employees who have personal and/or work-related problems.” This can include things like childcare access, mental health counseling, interpersonal violence resources, substance use resources and more. If you are employed, it is worth checking in with someone from Human Resources to see if you have access to a program like this.  

RC: Building off that, some health insurance providers offer incentives for preventative health initiatives, which might include things like defraying the cost of a gym membership, supporting exercise classes and/or weight-management programs, or subsidizing the cost of massage, acupuncture, etc…  

AG: Again, check in with your insurance provider to see what kinds of incentives you may have access to. We recognize that these types of programs are not common across all sectors and regions; in addition, if you are not employed they are inaccessible. However, there are often still community-based resources that may be available to you. Some examples of these may be: Planned Parenthood, community health clinics, and other mobile clinics.

RC: In many smaller towns, the Chamber of Commerce maintains a list of (generally) reduced-cost health resources that may be useful.  It’s really important to reiterate here that the availability of resources is very much based on the the community in which you find yourself.  It can feel onerous to navigate when moving to a new community; often people find that word-of-mouth and/or connecting with trusted resources for recommendations.  Finally, it may be worth googling and then following up to vet free health resources in your community.

AG: Next week we will give an overview of some national resources and will focus on post-grad interpersonal health! Congrats on graduation!!